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First Time in Indian History Forex reserves touched $500 billion mark. Today India overtook Russia & Korea to become 3rd largest forex reserve holder after China and Japan as the robust foreign funds inflow amid a raging Pandemic drives the country towards a momentous Landmark.

First Time in Indian History Forex reserves touched $500 billion mark. Today India overtook Russia & Korea to become 3rd largest forex reserve holder after China and Japan as the robust foreign funds inflow amid a raging Pandemic drives the country towards a momentous Landmark. submitted by BigSurround2 to indianews [link] [comments]

No, the British did not steal $45 trillion from India

This is an updated copy of the version on BadHistory. I plan to update it in accordance with the feedback I got.
I'd like to thank two people who will remain anonymous for helping me greatly with this post (you know who you are)
Three years ago a festschrift for Binay Bhushan Chaudhuri was published by Shubhra Chakrabarti, a history teacher at the University of Delhi and Utsa Patnaik, a Marxist economist who taught at JNU until 2010.
One of the essays in the festschirt by Utsa Patnaik was an attempt to quantify the "drain" undergone by India during British Rule. Her conclusion? Britain robbed India of $45 trillion (or £9.2 trillion) during their 200 or so years of rule. This figure was immensely popular, and got republished in several major news outlets (here, here, here, here (they get the number wrong) and more recently here), got a mention from the Minister of External Affairs & returns 29,100 results on Google. There's also plenty of references to it here on Reddit.
Patnaik is not the first to calculate such a figure. Angus Maddison thought it was £100 million, Simon Digby said £1 billion, Javier Estaban said £40 million see Roy (2019). The huge range of figures should set off some alarm bells.
So how did Patnaik calculate this (shockingly large) figure? Well, even though I don't have access to the festschrift, she conveniently has written an article detailing her methodology here. Let's have a look.
How exactly did the British manage to diddle us and drain our wealth’ ? was the question that Basudev Chatterjee (later editor of a volume in the Towards Freedom project) had posed to me 50 years ago when we were fellow-students abroad.
This is begging the question.
After decades of research I find that using India’s commodity export surplus as the measure and applying an interest rate of 5%, the total drain from 1765 to 1938, compounded up to 2016, comes to £9.2 trillion; since $4.86 exchanged for £1 those days, this sum equals about $45 trillion.
This is completely meaningless. To understand why it's meaningless consider India's annual coconut exports. These are almost certainly a surplus but the surplus in trade is countered by the other country buying the product (indeed, by definition, trade surpluses contribute to the GDP of a nation which hardly plays into intuitive conceptualisations of drain).
Furthermore, Dewey (2019) critiques the 5% interest rate.
She [Patnaik] consistently adopts statistical assumptions (such as compound interest at a rate of 5% per annum over centuries) that exaggerate the magnitude of the drain
Moving on:
The exact mechanism of drain, or transfers from India to Britain was quite simple.
Convenient.
Drain theory possessed the political merit of being easily grasped by a nation of peasants. [...] No other idea could arouse people than the thought that they were being taxed so that others in far off lands might live in comfort. [...] It was, therefore, inevitable that the drain theory became the main staple of nationalist political agitation during the Gandhian era.
- Chandra et al. (1989)
The key factor was Britain’s control over our taxation revenues combined with control over India’s financial gold and forex earnings from its booming commodity export surplus with the world. Simply put, Britain used locally raised rupee tax revenues to pay for its net import of goods, a highly abnormal use of budgetary funds not seen in any sovereign country.
The issue with figures like these is they all make certain methodological assumptions that are impossible to prove. From Roy in Frankema et al. (2019):
the "drain theory" of Indian poverty cannot be tested with evidence, for several reasons. First, it rests on the counterfactual that any money saved on account of factor payments abroad would translate into domestic investment, which can never be proved. Second, it rests on "the primitive notion that all payments to foreigners are "drain"", that is, on the assumption that these payments did not contribute to domestic national income to the equivalent extent (Kumar 1985, 384; see also Chaudhuri 1968). Again, this cannot be tested. [...] Fourth, while British officers serving India did receive salaries that were many times that of the average income in India, a paper using cross-country data shows that colonies with better paid officers were governed better (Jones 2013).
Indeed, drain theory rests on some very weak foundations. This, in of itself, should be enough to dismiss any of the other figures that get thrown out. Nonetheless, I felt it would be a useful exercise to continue exploring Patnaik's take on drain theory.
The East India Company from 1765 onwards allocated every year up to one-third of Indian budgetary revenues net of collection costs, to buy a large volume of goods for direct import into Britain, far in excess of that country’s own needs.
So what's going on here? Well Roy (2019) explains it better:
Colonial India ran an export surplus, which, together with foreign investment, was used to pay for services purchased from Britain. These payments included interest on public debt, salaries, and pensions paid to government offcers who had come from Britain, salaries of managers and engineers, guaranteed profts paid to railway companies, and repatriated business profts. How do we know that any of these payments involved paying too much? The answer is we do not.
So what was really happening is the government was paying its workers for services (as well as guaranteeing profits - to promote investment - something the GoI does today Dalal (2019), and promoting business in India), and those workers were remitting some of that money to Britain. This is hardly a drain (unless, of course, Indian diaspora around the world today are "draining" it). In some cases, the remittances would take the form of goods (as described) see Chaudhuri (1983):
It is obvious that these debit items were financed through the export surplus on merchandise account, and later, when railway construction started on a large scale in India, through capital import. Until 1833 the East India Company followed a cumbersome method in remitting the annual home charges. This was to purchase export commodities in India out of revenue, which were then shipped to London and the proceeds from their sale handed over to the home treasury.
While Roy's earlier point argues better paid officers governed better, it is honestly impossible to say what part of the repatriated export surplus was a drain, and what was not. However calling all of it a drain is definitely misguided.
It's worth noting that Patnaik seems to make no attempt to quantify the benefits of the Raj either, Dewey (2019)'s 2nd criticism:
she [Patnaik] consistently ignores research that would tend to cut the economic impact of the drain down to size, such as the work on the sources of investment during the industrial revolution (which shows that industrialisation was financed by the ploughed-back profits of industrialists) or the costs of empire school (which stresses the high price of imperial defence)

Since tropical goods were highly prized in other cold temperate countries which could never produce them, in effect these free goods represented international purchasing power for Britain which kept a part for its own use and re-exported the balance to other countries in Europe and North America against import of food grains, iron and other goods in which it was deficient.
Re-exports necessarily adds value to goods when the goods are processed and when the goods are transported. The country with the largest navy at the time would presumably be in very good stead to do the latter.
The British historians Phyllis Deane and WA Cole presented an incorrect estimate of Britain’s 18th-19th century trade volume, by leaving out re-exports completely. I found that by 1800 Britain’s total trade was 62% higher than their estimate, on applying the correct definition of trade including re-exports, that is used by the United Nations and by all other international organisations.
While interesting, and certainly expected for such an old book, re-exporting necessarily adds value to goods.
When the Crown took over from the Company, from 1861 a clever system was developed under which all of India’s financial gold and forex earnings from its fast-rising commodity export surplus with the world, was intercepted and appropriated by Britain. As before up to a third of India’s rising budgetary revenues was not spent domestically but was set aside as ‘expenditure abroad’.
So, what does this mean? Britain appropriated all of India's earnings, and then spent a third of it aboard? Not exactly. She is describing home charges see Roy (2019) again:
Some of the expenditures on defense and administration were made in sterling and went out of the country. This payment by the government was known as the Home Charges. For example, interest payment on loans raised to finance construction of railways and irrigation works, pensions paid to retired officers, and purchase of stores, were payments in sterling. [...] almost all money that the government paid abroad corresponded to the purchase of a service from abroad. [...] The balance of payments system that emerged after 1800 was based on standard business principles. India bought something and paid for it. State revenues were used to pay for wages of people hired abroad, pay for interest on loans raised abroad, and repatriation of profits on foreign investments coming into India. These were legitimate market transactions.
Indeed, if paying for what you buy is drain, then several billions of us are drained every day.
The Secretary of State for India in Council, based in London, invited foreign importers to deposit with him the payment (in gold, sterling and their own currencies) for their net imports from India, and these gold and forex payments disappeared into the yawning maw of the SoS’s account in the Bank of England.
It should be noted that India having two heads was beneficial, and encouraged investment per Roy (2019):
The fact that the India Office in London managed a part of the monetary system made India creditworthy, stabilized its currency, and encouraged foreign savers to put money into railways and private enterprise in India. Current research on the history of public debt shows that stable and large colonies found it easier to borrow abroad than independent economies because the investors trusted the guarantee of the colonist powers.

Against India’s net foreign earnings he issued bills, termed Council bills (CBs), to an equivalent rupee value. The rate (between gold-linked sterling and silver rupee) at which the bills were issued, was carefully adjusted to the last farthing, so that foreigners would never find it more profitable to ship financial gold as payment directly to Indians, compared to using the CB route. Foreign importers then sent the CBs by post or by telegraph to the export houses in India, that via the exchange banks were paid out of the budgeted provision of sums under ‘expenditure abroad’, and the exporters in turn paid the producers (peasants and artisans) from whom they sourced the goods.
Sunderland (2013) argues CBs had two main roles (and neither were part of a grand plot to keep gold out of India):
Council bills had two roles. They firstly promoted trade by handing the IO some control of the rate of exchange and allowing the exchange banks to remit funds to India and to hedge currency transaction risks. They also enabled the Indian government to transfer cash to England for the payment of its UK commitments.

The United Nations (1962) historical data for 1900 to 1960, show that for three decades up to 1928 (and very likely earlier too) India posted the second highest merchandise export surplus in the world, with USA in the first position. Not only were Indians deprived of every bit of the enormous international purchasing power they had earned over 175 years, even its rupee equivalent was not issued to them since not even the colonial government was credited with any part of India’s net gold and forex earnings against which it could issue rupees. The sleight-of-hand employed, namely ‘paying’ producers out of their own taxes, made India’s export surplus unrequited and constituted a tax-financed drain to the metropolis, as had been correctly pointed out by those highly insightful classical writers, Dadabhai Naoroji and RCDutt.
It doesn't appear that others appreciate their insight Roy (2019):
K. N. Chaudhuri rightly calls such practice ‘confused’ economics ‘coloured by political feelings’.

Surplus budgets to effect such heavy tax-financed transfers had a severe employment–reducing and income-deflating effect: mass consumption was squeezed in order to release export goods. Per capita annual foodgrains absorption in British India declined from 210 kg. during the period 1904-09, to 157 kg. during 1937-41, and to only 137 kg by 1946.
Dewey (1978) points out reliability issues with Indian agriculutural statistics, however this calorie decline persists to this day. Some of it is attributed to less food being consumed at home Smith (2015), a lower infectious disease burden Duh & Spears (2016) and diversified diets Vankatesh et al. (2016).
If even a part of its enormous foreign earnings had been credited to it and not entirely siphoned off, India could have imported modern technology to build up an industrial structure as Japan was doing.
This is, unfortunately, impossible to prove. Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication that India would've united (this is arguably more plausible than the given counterfactual1). Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication India would not have been nuked in WW2, much like Japan. Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication India would not have been invaded by lizard people, much like Japan. The list continues eternally.
Nevertheless, I will charitably examine the given counterfactual anyway. Did pre-colonial India have industrial potential? The answer is a resounding no.
From Gupta (1980):
This article starts from the premise that while economic categories - the extent of commodity production, wage labour, monetarisation of the economy, etc - should be the basis for any analysis of the production relations of pre-British India, it is the nature of class struggles arising out of particular class alignments that finally gives the decisive twist to social change. Arguing on this premise, and analysing the available evidence, this article concludes that there was little potential for industrial revolution before the British arrived in India because, whatever might have been the character of economic categories of that period, the class relations had not sufficiently matured to develop productive forces and the required class struggle for a 'revolution' to take place.
A view echoed in Raychaudhuri (1983):
Yet all of this did not amount to an economic situation comparable to that of western Europe on the eve of the industrial revolution. Her technology - in agriculture as well as manufacturers - had by and large been stagnant for centuries. [...] The weakness of the Indian economy in the mid-eighteenth century, as compared to pre-industrial Europe was not simply a matter of technology and commercial and industrial organization. No scientific or geographical revolution formed part of the eighteenth-century Indian's historical experience. [...] Spontaneous movement towards industrialisation is unlikely in such a situation.
So now we've established India did not have industrial potential, was India similar to Japan just before the Meiji era? The answer, yet again, unsurprisingly, is no. Japan's economic situation was not comparable to India's, which allowed for Japan to finance its revolution. From Yasuba (1986):
All in all, the Japanese standard of living may not have been much below the English standard of living before industrialization, and both of them may have been considerably higher than the Indian standard of living. We can no longer say that Japan started from a pathetically low economic level and achieved a rapid or even "miraculous" economic growth. Japan's per capita income was almost as high as in Western Europe before industrialization, and it was possible for Japan to produce surplus in the Meiji Period to finance private and public capital formation.
The circumstances that led to Meiji Japan were extremely unique. See Tomlinson (1985):
Most modern comparisons between India and Japan, written by either Indianists or Japanese specialists, stress instead that industrial growth in Meiji Japan was the product of unique features that were not reproducible elsewhere. [...] it is undoubtably true that Japan's progress to industrialization has been unique and unrepeatable
So there you have it. Unsubstantiated statistical assumptions, calling any number you can a drain & assuming a counterfactual for no good reason gets you this $45 trillion number. Hopefully that's enough to bury it in the ground.
1. Several authors have affirmed that Indian identity is a colonial artefact. For example see Rajan 1969:
Perhaps the single greatest and most enduring impact of British rule over India is that it created an Indian nation, in the modern political sense. After centuries of rule by different dynasties overparts of the Indian sub-continent, and after about 100 years of British rule, Indians ceased to be merely Bengalis, Maharashtrians,or Tamils, linguistically and culturally.
or see Bryant 2000:
But then, it would be anachronistic to condemn eighteenth-century Indians, who served the British, as collaborators, when the notion of 'democratic' nationalism or of an Indian 'nation' did not then exist. [...] Indians who fought for them, differed from the Europeans in having a primary attachment to a non-belligerent religion, family and local chief, which was stronger than any identity they might have with a more remote prince or 'nation'.

Bibliography

Chakrabarti, Shubra & Patnaik, Utsa (2018). Agrarian and other histories: Essays for Binay Bhushan Chaudhuri. Colombia University Press
Hickel, Jason (2018). How the British stole $45 trillion from India. The Guardian
Bhuyan, Aroonim & Sharma, Krishan (2019). The Great Loot: How the British stole $45 trillion from India. Indiapost
Monbiot, George (2020). English Landowners have stolen our rights. It is time to reclaim them. The Guardian
Tsjeng, Zing (2020). How Britain Stole $45 trillion from India with trains | Empires of Dirt. Vice
Chaudhury, Dipanjan (2019). British looted $45 trillion from India in today’s value: Jaishankar. The Economic Times
Roy, Tirthankar (2019). How British rule changed India's economy: The Paradox of the Raj. Palgrave Macmillan
Patnaik, Utsa (2018). How the British impoverished India. Hindustan Times
Tuovila, Alicia (2019). Expenditure method. Investopedia
Dewey, Clive (2019). Changing the guard: The dissolution of the nationalist–Marxist orthodoxy in the agrarian and agricultural history of India. The Indian Economic & Social History Review
Chandra, Bipan et al. (1989). India's Struggle for Independence, 1857-1947. Penguin Books
Frankema, Ewout & Booth, Anne (2019). Fiscal Capacity and the Colonial State in Asia and Africa, c. 1850-1960. Cambridge University Press
Dalal, Sucheta (2019). IL&FS Controversy: Centre is Paying Up on Sovereign Guarantees to ADB, KfW for Group's Loan. TheWire
Chaudhuri, K.N. (1983). X - Foreign Trade and Balance of Payments (1757–1947). Cambridge University Press
Sunderland, David (2013). Financing the Raj: The City of London and Colonial India, 1858-1940. Boydell Press
Dewey, Clive (1978). Patwari and Chaukidar: Subordinate officials and the reliability of India’s agricultural statistics. Athlone Press
Smith, Lisa (2015). The great Indian calorie debate: Explaining rising undernourishment during India’s rapid economic growth. Food Policy
Duh, Josephine & Spears, Dean (2016). Health and Hunger: Disease, Energy Needs, and the Indian Calorie Consumption Puzzle. The Economic Journal
Vankatesh, P. et al. (2016). Relationship between Food Production and Consumption Diversity in India – Empirical Evidences from Cross Section Analysis. Agricultural Economics Research Review
Gupta, Shaibal (1980). Potential of Industrial Revolution in Pre-British India. Economic and Political Weekly
Raychaudhuri, Tapan (1983). I - The mid-eighteenth-century background. Cambridge University Press
Yasuba, Yasukichi (1986). Standard of Living in Japan Before Industrialization: From what Level did Japan Begin? A Comment. The Journal of Economic History
Tomblinson, B.R. (1985). Writing History Sideways: Lessons for Indian Economic Historians from Meiji Japan. Cambridge University Press
Rajan, M.S. (1969). The Impact of British Rule in India. Journal of Contemporary History
Bryant, G.J. (2000). Indigenous Mercenaries in the Service of European Imperialists: The Case of the Sepoys in the Early British Indian Army, 1750-1800. War in History
submitted by GaslightEveryone to u/GaslightEveryone [link] [comments]

In 1947, India had just Rs 1500 crore cash. Today, we are about to cross $500 billion in foreign reserves. We have come a long way

In 1947, when India got independence, we had just Rs 1500 crore in cash with us, and even paying Rs 55 crore to Pakistan was a big deal. Mahatma Gandhi had to keep a day's fast to convince Vallabhbhai Patel to transfer Rs 55 crore to Pakistan.
Then we started storing foreign reserves to the calamity and emergency.
In 1960, India had foreign reserves of $1.46 billion, which could have lasted just 8 weeks of import.
In 1980, India had foreign reserves of $7 billion
In 1991, India's foreign reserves dipped to an alarming level of just $1.2 billion, which could have lasted just 3 weeks of imports. RBI had to pledge 46.91 tonnes of gold with the Bank of England and the Bank of Japan, and raised $400 million to deal with the unprecedented crisis
In 2004, for the first time, we achieved foreign reserves of $100 billion
Due to solid performance of our foreign reserves, we somehow navigated the recession of 2009, and our foreign reserves stood at $270 billion
And now, for the first time in our history, India will have $500 billion of foreign reserves. As of now, we have $493 billion, which is enough to sustain 17 months of imports.
We are right now world's 3rd biggest nation with foreign reserves, after China and Japan.
India has indeed come a long way from having just Rs 1500 crore in cash to pledging Gold to sustain the economy, to crossing half a trillion-dollar of foreign reserves.
Sources: 1 2 3 4 5
submitted by wordswithmagic to india [link] [comments]

Money, Money, Money - Its always about the money!


Some economists (but not all economists) believe that the USD and the US economy is losing its integrity and may ultimately collapse.
https://www.businessinsider.com.au/dollar-crash-swelling-deficit-deglobalization-stephen-roach-coronavirus-stimulus-recession-2020-6?r=US&IR=T
https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2020-06-14/dollar-crash-how-will-it-unfold
https://www.investopedia.com/articles/forex-currencies/091416/what-would-it-take-us-dollar-collapse.asp
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/06/upshot/coronavirus-economic-crisis.html
https://www.ft.com/content/d5f05b5c-7db8-11ea-8fdb-7ec06edeef84
https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/dollar-crash-swelling-deficit-deglobalization-stephen-roach-coronavirus-stimulus-recession-2020-6-1029312845?op=1
https://medium.com/@baileybarney/will-the-us-dollar-collapse-23e707f19da0

Question: If accurate, what would replace the USD as the global reserve currency?
Answer: The IMF is ready with a replacement global reserve currency called SDR's!

  1. https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2019/12/future-of-the-IMF-special-drawing-right-SDR-Ocampo.htm
" In this brave new world, is it time to rethink the SDR’s role?" (Ocampo)"The IMF should not pass up this opportunity" (Ocampo)
  1. https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/imf-special-drawing-right-global-currency-by-jose-antonio-ocampo-2019-04?barrier=accesspaylog
3.https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/business/2017/ap24/imf-populism-nationalism-sdr-reserve-currency
4.https://www.imf.org/en/About/Factsheets/Sheets/2016/08/01/14/51/Special-Drawing-Right-SDR
5.https://www.theigc.org/project/the-viability-of-the-special-drawing-rights-as-an-international-reserve-asset/
6.https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.livemint.com/news/india/consensus-remains-elusive-among-g20-countries-on-fresh-sdr-allocation/amp-11595160202040.html
7.https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.ft.com/content/43a67e06-bbeb-4bea-8939-bc29ca785b0e
8.https://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/27/business/27imf.html
9.https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/1998/09/24/one-world-one-money
10.https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cityam.com/world-reserve-currencies-is-the-us-dollars-days-numbered/amp/
11.https://www.eastasiaforum.org/2019/09/22/the-dollar-shouldnt-be-the-reserve-currency-but-neither-should-the-renminbi/

Will CBDC's be created at the same time as the SDR's? Will exchange rates of CBDC's be anchored to Quotas? Is the IMF a fund or potentially more like a Central Bank for the World? How did the IMF come about?
Central Bank Digital Coins - CBDC's
https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/Staff-Discussion-Notes/Issues/2018/11/13/Casting-Light-on-Central-Bank-Digital-Currencies-46233

2.https://www.imf.org/en/News/Articles/2019/05/13/sp051419-stablecoins-central-bank-digital-currencies-and-cross-border-payments
https://www.google.com/amp/s/techwireasia.com/amp/2020/03/central-banks-are-keen-on-digital-currencies-the-imf-is-backing-them/
3.
https://m.economictimes.com/markets/stocks/news/central-banks-wake-up-to-digital-currency-create-new-framework-with-wef/articleshow/73554517.cms
4.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/pawelkuskowski/2020/06/07/central-bank-digital-currencies-cbdc-a-crisis-recovery-tool-for-governments/5.
https://www.weforum.org/press/2020/01/central-banks-waking-up-to-digital-currency-create-new-framework-for-cbdc-deployment-with-world-economic-forum-177ca5d9ee/6.
https://www.theblockcrypto.com/linked/41243/imf-officials-say-synthetic-cbdc-with-a-public-private-partnership-is-the-better-option7.
https://blockchain.news/insight/private-firms-can-boost-innovation-of-central-bank-digital-currencysays-imf-8.
https://coinidol.com/official-promote-digital-currency/9.
https://bitcoinexchangeguide.com/top-imf-official-calls-for-synthetic-central-bank-digital-currencies-cbdc-development/10
  1. England:https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2020-07-13/bank-of-england-debating-digital-currency-creation-bailey-says
  2. USA:https://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonbrett/2020/03/23/new-coronavirus-stimulus-bill-introduces-digital-dollar-and-digital-dollar-wallets/amp/
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.wsj.com/amp/articles/fed-digital-dollars-are-part-of-debate-over-coronavirus-stimulus-11585085518
  1. Australiahttps://www.businessinsider.com.au/the-rba-has-been-secretly-working-on-an-all-digital-version-of-the-australian-dollar-but-it-may-not-release-it-to-the-public-at-all-2020-1
https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/submissions/payments-system/financial-and-regulatory-technology/
  1. Canadahttps://www.ledgerinsights.com/canada-exploring-consumer-cbdc/
  2. Swedenhttps://www.google.com/amp/s/cointelegraph.com/news/sweden-is-testing-its-new-central-bank-digital-currency/amp
  3. Norwayhttps://www.norges-bank.no/en/news-events/news-publications/News-items/2019/2019-06-27-cbdc/
  4. European Unionhttps://www.google.com/amp/s/finance.yahoo.com/amphtml/news/dutch-central-bank-wants-european-191627776.html
  5. Singaporehttps://chainbulletin.com/singapore-ready-to-explore-cbdc-together-with-china/amp/
  6. New Zealand:https://investmentnews.co.nz/investment-news/digital-central-bank-money-tipped-for-world-dominance/
  7. Chinahttps://www.ledgerinsights.com/china-central-bank-digital-currency-cbdc-renminbi-dolla

SideNote:

The World Economic Forum is planning a major event for January of 2021 that will focus on the "Great Reset" and the "4th Industrial Revolution".
https://www.weforum.org/great-reset/
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/01/what-is-the-fourth-industrial-revolution/

Prince Charles wants to reset - Do you?
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/jun/03/pandemic-is-chance-to-reset-global-economy-says-prince-charles

What are they gonna reset?

TL:DR
!. Potential collapse of the US dollar.
  1. Replaced by IMF SDR's
3.Complimented by new CBDC's
  1. How is this connection the WEF "Great Reset..
Its time to read, learn and share!

Edit = Added TL:DR
submitted by andrew77mc to conspiracy [link] [comments]

The Daily Autist 03/31/20 For The Autists, By An Autist

The Daily Autist

03/31/20

TLDR Of The News To Inform Your Moves
Dumb bulls and gay bears, welcome. Robinhood falsely gave me a PDT warning so I can’t buy or sell anything until it’s fixed. Until 04/03 I’m effectively just a spectator as I can’t close any position I open. My QQQ and SPY options will expire worthless when the market closes due to not being able to close after opening positions to sell later in the day yesterday. So get ready for a bitter one. (I know RH is shit, but everywhere else requires minimum balances or an arbitrary pass/fail determination so it is what it is)

WSB Summary

Y’all can look forward to this being on the news in a day or two, or even longer if he ends up going to court over it. If ever you want to get back at a shitty email, the best thing to do is post it to Reddit rather than reply bitterly.
My broker (Questrade) wants me to sign an NDA saying I won't talk shit about them after offering me $1200 USD as compensation for losing $50000 from outages : wallstreetbets
A meme sums up the end of last week and Monday better than any article.
All it takes is a printer to save the day : wallstreetbets
This gentleman will insert a beer in his ass if there’s a -10% day “anytime soon.” So roughly two weeks. What a total retard and I salute him.
I will butt chug a Corona if we see another -10% day anytime soon : wallstreetbets

Corona Dump

Nothing says “If you help with the pandemic you will be punished,” quite like going viral because of a difficult moment then having your house blow away.
https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/30/us/arkansas-tornado-destroys-doctors-home-trnd/index.htmlAMZN fired the worker who spoke out about their policies. I would say puts on AMZN but since bad news = good news last the last week amazon should break 2k again very soon.
https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/30/amazon-fires-staten-island-coronavirus-strike-leader-chris-smalls.html
Sections of GE that is still open and making other random medical and electrical shit are striking to divert their energy to ventilators. Kudos to them fr. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/coronavirus-general-electric-workers-ventilators-work-stoppage-labor-massachusetts-a9436881.html
It’s almost like having healthcare be a for-profit industry means people will try to profit off medical treatments. I hate this “now I'm woke but in 3 months I won’t be,” garbage people are doing for clicks.
https://www.propublica.org/article/taxpayers-paid-millions-to-design-a-low-cost-ventilator-for-a-pandemic-instead-the-company-is-selling-versions-of-it-overseas-
Killing our medical workers due to negligence and worry for the market. I recommend reading this when the market closes as it’s a little long and not related to the market other than warning things will continue to get worse rather than better for the near future stability wise.
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/927811?nlid=134774_3901&src=wnl_newsalrt_200330_MSCPEDIT&uac=24257DJ&impID=2329672&faf=1

Business/Finance

Now that Canada passed the extra stimulus for its citizens Air Canada laid off its employees. This is how it was supposed to work for the US. Still, a sign that if not artificially kept afloat by the government these airlines are fucked.
https://www.thestandard.com.hk/breaking-news/section/2/144720/Air-Canada-lays-off-16,500-staff-due-to-virus
Turns out the two most rapidly growing and advancing countries will continue to grow and advance while the rest of the world falls backward. 200 IQ play by China
https://m.economictimes.com/news/economy/indicators/world-economy-will-go-into-recession-with-likely-exception-of-india-china-united-nations/articleshow/74905696.cms
China is reopening manufacturing. They have enough people to let the virus do it’s thing and not care. They don’t have audited medical numbers. This is bad for short term puts.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-economy-pmi-factory-official/china-factory-activity-unexpectedly-expands-but-economy-unable-to-shake-off-virus-shock-idUSKBN21I05S
USD continues to be king. What a time to be alive.
https://www.reuters.com/article/global-forex/forex-dollar-gains-yuan-steady-after-china-pmi-in-cautious-trade-idUSL4N2BO1NJ
Futures continue their bullish trend with another 1% gain overnight. Until there’s another manic day of 6%+ it’s looking the bulls are still in control in a stable manner.
https://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/stock-futures-trade-cautiously-higher-after-mondays-rally
Premarket 261-263 all morning. What is this boring stable shit? 261.93 at time of posting (06:50 EST)

NostraLosses Prediction:

Keep buying short term calls until there’s a significant signal otherwise. All the DD in the world gets wiped out by a heavy enough BRRRRRRRt. I got some far OTM calls to hedge my put bets Friday EOD and Monday and if it weren’t for the false PDT warning I would have almost made back the losses to be back to even. So try not to go full retard on the puts, and if you can afford it, don’t use Robinhood.

Post your thoughts, questions, complaints, compliments, and plays in the comments.

Edited for formatting errors due to importing from Grammarly.
submitted by AvocadosAreMeh to wallstreetbets2 [link] [comments]

Sri Lanka seeks USD 1.1 billion currency swap facility from India amidst depleting forex reserves

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 47%. (I'm a bot)
COLOMBO: Sri Lankan President Gotabaya Rajapaksa has requested India to provide a special USD 1.1 billion currency swap facility to boost the country's draining foreign exchange reserves in view of the economic slowdown due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Rajapaksa's office said that the new request is in addition to the USD 400 million amount Sri Lanka has sought from the Indian government under the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation framework.
Rajapaksa's office said: "If the government of India could provide USD 1.1 billion special SWAP facility to top up USD 400 million under the SAARC facility, it would enormously help Sri Lanka in dealing with our foreign exchange issues".
Sri Lanka had previously asked India for a 400 million dollar foreign exchange swap under the SAARC arrangements.
Facing issues in its foreign exchange during the coronavirus pandemic, Sri Lanka has taken drastic measures to keep its foreign reserves and currency stability.
India has sent four consignments of essential life-saving medicines and medical supplies weighing over 25 tonnes to Sri Lanka in the last few weeks as a goodwill gesture.
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Indians Are Sending Home a Record Amount of Money This Year

Indians Are Sending Home a Record Amount of Money This Year submitted by SaveOnSend_com to india [link] [comments]

China became a world power without raping and launching genocides against other nations

I'm really tired of this hate against China, specially on Reddit. Furthermore, China has only been helping other countries. We just pumped $2.2 Billion to Pakistan's economy to save themselves from an economic collapse, a $140 million deal for Nepal, and over $41 billion invested so far in African countries to help them grow.

And guess what? No colonisation, no rapes or genocides, no forced religious conversions and no invasions.
submitted by Critical__Finance to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

So the "PM to hold meeting over rupee fall and oil prices" which led to a major correction in USDINR was hogwash

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/markets/forex/arun-jaitley-outlines-series-of-measures-to-stem-declines-in-rupee/articleshow/65817663.cms
i really doubt any of this will be counted as a serious measure to stem the fall of the rupee. Expect it to open and edge towards 73 again.
submitted by mouthbreatherfan to IndiaInvestments [link] [comments]

Pakistan's China debt at $6.6bn. In past 10 months, funds mostly used on two nuclear plants

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 60%. (I'm a bot)
NEW DELHI: The debt owed by Pakistan to China has been pegged at $6.56 billion for the July-April period, equal to three-fourths of the total $8.6 billion worth loans that Islamabad received in the past 10 months.
These loans are for the Karachi nuclear power plants, known as K2 and K3, and China SAFE deposits.
Out of the $6.5-billion loans from China, $2 billion was in SAFE deposits and $2.53 billion in foreign commercial loans, to cushion declining forex reserves.
China Development Bank gave $2.24 billion as a short-term loan, while Industrial and Commercial Bank of China disbursed $300 million.
China gave $628.4 million for the construction of two ongoing nuclear power plants in the past 10 months, Pakistan finance ministry statistics revealed.
China also gave $1.4 billion in project financing in the past 10 months, largely for projects that form part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor.
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Pakistan's rupee keeps sliding after IMF loan accord reached

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 35%. (I'm a bot)
The rupee, which lost 3.6 per cent on Thursday to close at 146.2 against the U.S. dollar in the interbank market, dropped further on Friday, dealers said, selling at 149.50 in the interbank market and 150 in the open market.
The fall reflects the IMF's condition for a "Market-based exchange rate mechanism, which will see limited intervention by the central bank now," said Saad Hashemy, chief economist and research director at Topline Securities in Karachi.
Pakistan's stock market also declined on Friday, with the benchmark KSE 100 index down 2.4 per cent by 0615 GMT. While the exact conditions of a final IMF deal are still unknown, Sunday's Staff-Level accord, which must still be approved by the Fund's board in Washington, said a "Market-determined" exchange rate would help the financial sector.
Late on Thursday, the central bank issued a statement saying the sharp fall in the rupee "Reflects demand and supply conditions in the foreign exchange market" and would help in correcting market imbalances.
While many analysts see the rupee as overvalued and say the central bank has wasted billions defending it, a weaker currency is likely to fuel inflation, which is already over 8 per cent, with power and fuel prices hit especially hard.
The central bank, which is due to announce its latest interest rate decision on Monday, said late on Thursday that its foreign exchange reserves fell $138 million in the week ending May 10 to $8.846 billion, less than needed to cover three months of imports.
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For Beginners: Stablecoins: Explaining what stablecoins are and why they’re so important for the cryptocurrency industry

For Beginners: Stablecoins: Explaining what stablecoins are and why they’re so important for the cryptocurrency industry

https://preview.redd.it/0rico0vtytz11.png?width=2970&format=png&auto=webp&s=492f4edb6a613249a68f6a97c3fc70eebcac23e9
With the seemingly endless amount of coins entering the market each year, we are beginning to see various categories of digital assets emerge. One of these classifications of coins is known as stablecoins, and although you may see it as ironic that a cryptocurrency is labeled as being “stable,” that’s actually exactly what they are known for. Stablecoins make up a unique category of coins in the market that are poised to bring stability and trust back into the cryptocurrency market. With that being said, let’s go over what stablecoins are and why they are so important for the development of the cryptocurrency industry as a whole.
This is not financial investment advice. This article will touch upon key aspects of what stablecoins are and why they can help the growth of the crypto industry.

Terminology

Blockchain: The easiest way to understand blockchain is to think of it as a fully transparent and continuously updated record of the exchange of information through a network of personal computers, a system which nobody fully owns. This makes it decentralized and extremely difficult for anyone to single-handedly hack or corrupt the system, pretty much guaranteeing full validity and trust in each exchange of information.
Volatility: The rate at which the price of a security increases or decreases for a given set of returns. Volatility is measured by calculating the standard deviation of the annualized returns over a given period of time. It shows the range to which the price of a security may increase or decrease.
Fiat: Currency that a government has declared to be legal tender, but it is not backed by a physical commodity. The value of fiat money is derived from the relationship between supply and demand rather than the value of the material from which the money is made.
Decentralization: Essentially, if something is centralized, there’s a single point that does all of the work involved in any given action. On the flip side, if something is decentralized, there are multiple points that do the work.
Familiarize yourself with these key terms in order to better understand what stablecoins are.

What Are Stablecoins?

To put it simply, stablecoins are cryptocurrencies that are pegged or backed by some other asset. Some forms of stablecoins are tied to assets such as the dollar or a commodity like a bar of gold or a barrel of oil. Other forms of stablecoins are backed by cryptocurrencies, or even exist as self-correcting, algorithmically-controlled systems. Essentially, stablecoins hold the promise of a half-step between traditional assets and crypto assets, taking the best from both worlds while resulting in a much more accessible and efficient form of finance.
The concept of having a stablecoin of stable currency isn’t new, as governments have been considering the implementation of this idea for quite some time now. National governments have the same motivation as crypto economies to deal in stable assets, as volatility in any kind of currency scheme can lead to wild speculation and boom and bust values. Historically, there have been a few different ways of implementing currency pegs at the national scale. Some countries just start using another country’s currency in lieu of their own as legal tender. Other governments have decided to set a fixed peg, while others determine an acceptable range and let their currency float within a range in relation to the peg.
Even within the cryptocurrency world, people have been experimenting, with mixed results, with stablecoin design and setup. Tether is one of the most prominent stablecoins, which is a blockchain-based cryptocurrency whose coins in circulation are backed by an equivalent amount of traditional fiat currencies, like the dollar, the euro or the Japanese yen, which are held in a designated bank account. Tether tokens, the native tokens of the Tether network, trade under the USDT symbol.
Stablecoins are cryptocurrencies that are backed by another asset, such as fiat money or another algorithmically-controlled system. This keeps the value of that coins stable and lowers the threat of high volatility.

How Can They Impact The Crypto industry?

By definition, stablecoins are inherently different than the rest of the cryptocurrencies in the industry, as their value is determined and derived differently. With all the criticism and skepticism surrounding the industry today, many people have pointed to stablecoins as being one of the biggest proponents in legitimizing the cryptocurrency market as a viable asset class.
Stablecoins could quickly become the universally accepted, international currency of the future. They have the potential to empower everyone to take part in an evolving crypto-economy, without compromising security and freedom. If implemented at scale, they are poised to become a foundational component of the next-generation economy. One of the biggest attacks against the cryptocurrency market is that the coins are too volatile and that they have no safe backing. Stablecoins solve both of those issues while still serving as a digital asset that can perpetuate excitement for the market as a whole.
Stablecoins solve the issue of volatility and lack of inherent value by having an actual asset which determines its value. At this point, they can serve as mediums of payment and monetary value while maintaining a stable price.

Conclusion

Sure, the cryptocurrency market may be filled with coins that are highly volatile and may not have the backing of inherently valuable assets, but what if there were coins that could satisfy all of these points? Well, with stablecoins, all of these issues are solved and the possibility of using these coins as mediums of payments becomes real. Imagine having the ability to use a cryptocurrency that is essentially valued the same as other widely-used assets like fiat money, oil, or even gold? The digital asset economy is quickly revolutionizing the world, so keep an eye out for this category of cryptocurrencies to one day become the future of the industry.
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Have you used stablecoins before? What are some of our favorite stablecoins in the market? Let us know why in the comments!
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Metronomic Pre-General Election Rupee slide

Pre-election blues? Rupee slides again — April 2018 Simple graphic representation from the article
Similar articles from 4-5 years back.
Why does the rupee always fall prior to elections? - (Mentions the theory about Political parties and their proxies bringing in Dollars for more bang for their buck but also says hard to prove this and instead sticks to the usual election volatility and internal and global macro trends safe-theory) — Sept 2013
Rupee nears 69/dollar; posts biggest day fall in 18 years - (Mainly focuses on economic trends) — Aug 2013
The rupee, the dollar and election results - (mostly around domestic sentiment and domestic macro economics) — May 2014 but refers to late 2013 time frame as well.
Are elections bad for the rupee? — Aug 2013 Graph representation
Comment :—
Once or twice can be coincident or accident. Even economic theories aren't as predictable or have such high fidelity as this is turning out to be. Whatever be the base reason. There is most definitely a pattern and simply the existence of a General Election at regular intervals is not enough to explain this. A pattern in economics that stretches over decades is considered very significant. People can make Millions off such things, in all likely they are already, and maybe that is part of that base reason, maybe.
submitted by iVarun to india [link] [comments]

[Banned] /r/TheNewsFeed/: James Comey: Why Won't Donald Trump Criticize Vladimir Putin?

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[SERIOUS]Return of Middle East workers to Kerala and the impact. What will happen to real estate? Job scene? Social impact?

Read this article today.
Similar articles appeared recently in other dailies too.
What will be the impact in Kerala? I think the drying remittances will have major impact on its economy.
What jobs will these people do? Lower end jobs are already taken by migrants from other states. And Keralites are not known to be industrious within Kerala.
Also, as lot of returnees seems to be graduates and holding white collar jobs.
What is happening on jobs front?
Real estate? Prices could plunge? Is it happening?
Any well-conducted studies?
submitted by Indianopolice to india [link] [comments]

pakistan rupee: Pakistan devalues its currency for third time since December

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 58%. (I'm a bot)
By Faseeh Mangi Pakistan's central bank devalued the rupee for a third time since December amid a worsening economy and speculation the country will need support from the International Monetary Fund.
The managed currency dropped 3.7 percent to close at 119.84 per dollar on Monday, State Bank of Pakistan said in emailed statement.
"You want to give a signal to the IMF that Pakistan is doing its homework'' ahead of a possible loan program, said Mohammed Sohail, chief executive officer at Topline Securities Pakistan Ltd. in Karachi. There's"pressure on emerging-market currencies including Turkey, Indonesia and India, so you have to adjust yours as well.
State Bank of Pakistan expects the devaluation, interest rate increase and other measures "to contain the imbalances in the external account.
The global chief economist at Renaissance Capital, said the devaluation, which he predicted earlier this year, makes Pakistan the " most competitive currency in South Asia." The decision should support the country's export growth, he said.
Analysts say Pakistan's economic growth will slow in 2018 for the first time in six years.
Summary Source | FAQ | Feedback | Top keywords: Pakistan#1 year#2 bank#3 currency#4 IMF#5
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[Banned] /r/politics/: Can the GOP Survive a Trade War?

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[Banned] /r/nottheonion/: China’s Xi Jinping says he is opposed to life-long rule

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[Banned] /r/worldnews/: China’s Xi Jinping says he is opposed to life-long rule

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[Banned] /r/news/: China’s Xi Jinping says he is opposed to life-long rule

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[Banned] /r/worldnews/: China’s Xi Jinping says he is opposed to life-long rule

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[Banned] /r/politics/: China's Economy Brushes Aside Trump to Power Ahead in 2018

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